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Visit with Virtual Auditor and RISC at the Texas Chapters of HIMSS in Austin, Texas

VA and RISC for Texas HIMSS Feb 18 2015

 

Come visit with Virtual Auditor and RISC at the 7th Annual Regional Conference Texas Chapters of HIMSS in Austin! There will be over 400 healthcare IT professionals and optional preconference activities such as legislative visits at the State Capitol and Networking social. The focus will be on promoting the value of investing in Health Information Technology.

Wednesday, February 18, 2015 – Friday, February 20, 2015

Renaissance Austin Hotel

9721 Arboretum Blvd.

Virtual Auditor will be demonstrating an industry-leading Information Security Continuous Monitoring Solution (ISCMS). The ISCMS was specifically developed to help organizations including healthcare, banking, finance, and other heavily regulated industries, to meet their data privacy, information security, and compliance requirements. The ISCMS provides continuous monitoring, alerting, reporting, and event correlation, providing the data your techs want, your security folks wish they had, and your executives need! Visit www.VirtualAuditor.com for more information if you can’t see this amazing technology first hand.

Contact Sales@virtualauditor.com or 888-312-5151

For more information please visit: http://www.cvent.com/events/2015-texas-regional-himss-conference/event-summary-25f61ec35a2f482d99a39eb8605be861.aspx#

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Business Continuity, Cyber Security, Data Breach, Disaster Recovery, Education, HIPAA / HITECH Enforcement, Tip of the Week, Vulnerability Testing & Management

Is Your Organization’s New Years Resolution to Be More Secure?

Is Your Organization’s New Years Resolution to Be More Secure? If not, it should be!

However, that is too easy to say, and very hard to accomplish. The current threat environment is expanding far faster than the controls can hope to keep up with. A CISOs / CSOs job has never been harder; a trend that will continue this year and on into the future. If you don’t believe that call up organization’s like SONY, ebay (one of the least talked-about giant data breaches of the year), Target, JPMorgan Chase, Home Depot, Community Health Systems, or the 321 other healthcare organizations reporting breaches affecting over 83 million individuals! In fact, healthcare breaches accounted for a whopping 42.3% of data breaches included in the just-published Identity Theft Resource Center 2014 Data Breach Report(1).

Threat vectors include all of the usual suspects that we have been talking about for years. But the massive proliferation of data, accelerating migration to remote and teleworkers, and huge increase in activity of nation-states, organized crime, and hacktivists all make the CISOs / CSOs job next to impossible. It’s not a matter of whether an incident will happen to a modern connected company, but when.

Data breach incident handling must be a part of your data privacy and information security program. Balancing the need for speed of response, especially prompted by state-level data breach rules, with accuracy and responsible forensic activities is a tough challenge. It becomes tougher when interested parties such as the CEO, who suddenly realized that information security is important, compliance, legal, IT Management, public relations, the cyber security insurance carrier and their forensic experts, and the press all want constant feedback and a complete understanding of what happened, who did it, and how much is this going to cost us? from the word, “Go!”

Hopefully all of these parties were interested when the CISO / CSO asked to run a data breach incident drill last year in order to test the capabilities, response time, and training of all relevant parties to respond to such an incident. From our experience performing risk assessments, they were not, and a drill has never been completed.

Don’t let a real incident be the first time you test your data privacy and information security incident response plan. Remember a successful program is built on statements of policy, supporting procedures, tools, checklists, logs, forms, and training. If a real incident is your first test, chances are you are looking at a poor result, and a poor result is more likely to lead to fines and firings.

Since an incident is a matter of When Not If, testing your incident response plan should not be seen as optional or subject to perpetual procrastination!

Lastly, remember that while Information Technology (I.T.) is the system owner and the primary source of information in the event of an incident or breach, the problem is a business issue, not an I.T. issue! Consider addressing requirements and response in your Business Continuity Plan (BCP). BCP procrastination is a topic for another article!

Happy New Year and we’ll secure you in 2015

The team at RISC Management

(1) http://www.idtheftcenter.org/images/breach/DataBreachReports_2014.pdf